Interior Secretary Salazar Champions Green Energy Record

Bill Opalka | Apr 29, 2012

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U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar told a National Press Club audience in Washington, D.C. that the Obama administration has made great strides toward developing renewable energy on federal lands.

Most of the discussion last week centered on recent headlines like gasoline prices and the second anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil spill, for instance. Salazar also defended the Obama administration’s highly touted “all-of-the-above” energy strategy, and oil and gas drilling, in which the Interior Department has a major say.

Salazar also pushed more renewable energy development occurring on large tracts managed by Interiors’ Bureau of Land Management.

“Renewable energy production has doubled over the past three years,” Salazar said. “And on public lands, we’re well on our way to meeting the president’s goal of permitting 10,000 MW of large-scale renewable energy projects by the end of the year,” he said.

At the federal level, Obama policies were given credit for breaking logjams on site development on public lands and waters.

“At the beginning of 2009, not a single, large-scale solar energy project had been approved for construction,” he said. “Offshore, Cape Wind had been a process disaster languishing for eight long years in a process that had no end.”

He said 29 utility scale solar, wind and geothermal projects have been approved on federal lands in the West that will provide over 6,500 MW of clean power. Cape Wind has been approved and an offshore program has been put in place along the Atlantic Coast.

“None of this would have happened if we hadn’t ensured that government reviews are coordinated and done in a timely basis,” Salazar said.

He bemoaned Washington gridlock and the inability of any meaningful energy policy to be adopted. Salazar said public consensus has produced some progress in renewable energy.

“The states have been bringing in more wind, more solar, more biofuels,” Salazar said.
He cited federal proposals, currently stalled in Congress, to promote development: permanent tax credits and a national clean energy standard.

“There has been great progress in the past three years, from industry, investors, governments, scientists and stakeholders all deserve credit,” he added.
This being political season, Salazar didn’t resist poking fun at “the imaginary, fairly tale world of energy” promoted by administration opponents.

“Every day there’s a plan released to bring back $2 gasoline. Or, you would think there’s a secret agenda out there to shut down energy production,” he said.

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Salizar touts renewable energy

So Secretary Salizar thinks a secret agenda to shut down energy productin is a joke. Just ask yourself, "If I wanted to shut down US energy production and bring the US economy to its knees, what would I do differently than what is being done by the Obama administration?" Note that during the first two years of the Obama administration there was no gridlock as the democrats controlled the entire government. Ask yourself, "Why during this period was not legislation passed to enable the alternate energy production  we are told is needed?" And finally ask yourselves, "Will the approval of 6,500 MW of clean power do anything to improve the US economy and produce jobs now when we need them?"

These and many other unanswered questions show that the Obama administration has no clue as to what the country needs to grow out of the economic slump it is in.

Salazar Champions Green Record

we're making continual and strong progress with renewables, but not fast enough to stifle the negative effects of climate change in the world, e.g. China where millions of more cars pollute the air. The G7 and G20, Copenhagen and Durban aren't enough, we need a world standards body with the power of enforcement to save our planet for our grandchildren. That body could also rid the energy markets of speculators who are driving up the price of oil, gas etc. to make millions of pennies for their pockets, without adding any value to the supply chain at all.  We'll get there eventually, I just hope its in time.

Who do we entrust such authority to?

Man, you are talking about advancing a one-world-government it sounds like.  Just who do you think we should vest this power in?  The UN is a joke with its never-ending story of corruption and incompetence and any one-world-government is likely to be the same.  Also, when you talk of a program to "stifle the negative effects of climate change in the world", do you not realize that the climate is changing and always has changed since the beginning of the world.  While I will agree that mankind has an effect on climate change, I do not buy the argument that manmade CO2 is the chief cause of global climate change--maybe an aggravater of climate change but not the cause.  Who do you blame before man existed?

As for renewables being the savior of the world and still meeting the expanding electrical demand--not going to happen.  These technologies are not at a point where they are reliable, dispatchable, or steady without massive expenditures of money that no country seems to have.  I read that China is diverting their funds away from solar and wind to nuclear to keep that program going because they are smart enough to realize nuclear can deliver steady, reliable base-load power around the clock to provide power to continue their economic growth.

The real aggravating thing to me is that if the government in the US was not jacking around subsidizing wind farms and solar firms, that money would still be in the hands of investors who could plan additions to power production utilizing newer, cleaner, more efficient technologies than employed in the older facilities that would normally be replaced due to age and performance.  Only Uncle Sam's policies are making the power market so dicey, these people are not investing in those newer plants so the older plants are still online to backup renewables.

A new, advanced combined cycle gas turbine plant costs about half of what a corresponding peak capacity wind farm costs--maybe even less when one considers the cost of the long distance transmission lines.  It will deliver 3 times as many MWh to the grid during a year while simultaneously decreasing by roughly 60% the amount of CO2 emitted from a comparably sized older coal-fired plant.

A new, advanced ultra-supercritical coal fired plant costs roughly half as much as a solar PV facility of the same peak capacity.  It will deliver to the grid 4.75 times the number of MWh that the solar facility will while cutting the CO2 emissions of older coal fired facilities roughly 25% and other toxic emissions by almost 90% if the older plant is grandfathered from SOx and NOx (not to mention mercury, uranium and other such emissions).

Those new plants can make a nearly immediate (relatively speaking) impact on CO2 emissions while additional R&D brings down the costs of wind, solar, and energy storage technologies.  Without the last one--energy storage--reliable wind and solar are a pipe dream.

But you propose we give world-wide authority to a single entity dominated by green power proponents who think we should build only renewables?  We cannot even do things correctly on a national level--just think how screwed up it will get on a worldwide level.  That is a recipe for world tyranny.

 

Salazar Champions Green Record

we're making continual and strong progress with renewables, but not fast enough to stifle the negative effects of climate change in the world, e.g. China where millions of more cars pollute the air. The G7 and G20, Copenhagen and Durban aren't enough, we need a world standards body with the power of enforcement to save our planet for our grandchildren. That body could also rid the energy markets of speculators who are driving up the price of oil, gas etc. to make millions of pennies for their pockets, without adding any value to the supply chain at all.  We'll get there eventually, I just hope its in time.

"world standards body with the power of enforcement"

The proposed response to CAGW can be described as a four-legged stool:

Leg 1 - zero global annual carbon emissions;

Leg 2 - zero global animal husbandry;

Leg 3 - income and wealth redistribution;

Leg 4 - population controls; and,

Seat - global governance.

This would arguably be the ugliest and most expensive "stool" ever conceived and built by man. It is also a stool which could not be picked up by its "clean end".