Emmissions & Environmental

  • North Carolina's environmental agency said Thursday it won't file further coal ash lawsuits against Duke Energy, as advocacy groups prepared to sue the utility next week.
  • In the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on 11 March 2011, the Daiichi nuclear plant in Fukushima was badly wrecked in a series of meltdowns and explosions that severely damaged three reactors and one spent-fuel pool.
  • Environmentalists warn that a planned regional landfill in Randolph County could become a burial ground for worrisome amounts of coal ash.
  • Construction has been almost nonstop at the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill this year, with workers laboring even during a frigid January to build the treatment plants and filtering systems that keep the worst of the odors at bay.
  • APPA’s Kelly on Emissions, Cybersecurity

    Aug 31, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    America’s public power utilities in more than 2,000 communities are wrestling with the new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposals to curb carbon emissions, and at the same time they are joining other energy companies trying to make our grid more secure. Sue Kelly, the new president and chief executive officer of the American Public Power Association, discusses the challenges ahead. 

  • Federal regulators have proposed fines totaling $245,000 against two companies accused of violating environmental rules in Eastern Kentucky.
  • Federal environmental regulators failed to include information in rulemaking dockets on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and should withdraw the rules, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and a dozen other attorneys general said.
  • Residents in Lake County's northern cities can get up to $5,000 in free weatherization work that will keep their homes cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter, and cut their utility bills year-round.
  • While a new federal proposal won't affect West Virginia as much as other states, the policy stands on "shaky ground," according to the former top attorney for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • In 2003, President George W. Bush unveiled plans for the world's first zero-emissions coal plant, a project that would serve as a global showcase of America's ability to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuels.
  • The Armstrong County Commissioners threw their support behind the coal industry on Thursday by voicing their opposition to proposed federal power plant regulations.
  • Reliability concerns and an aggressive timeline for possible implementation were among the issues raised Thursday at an informational meeting on proposed carbon dioxide emissions rules for power plants.
  • An estimated 16 percent of the total fly ash produced at PPL's Montour coal-fired power plant will be used to fill a mine pit near Locust Summit over the next decade.
  • President Barack Obama's plan to reduce carbon emissions from power plants could increase electricity prices for consumers, according to a top official with a global business advisory firm.
  • Research is Critical

    Jul 06, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    We recently discussed the status of coal generation research with Tomasz S. Wiltowski, the director of the Coal Research Center at Southern Illinois University. His edited comments follow.

  • Energy Reform Revisited

    Max Bradford
    Jun 22, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    Fifteen years ago, the government of New Zealand forced energy companies to elect whether they wanted to sell energy or own power lines, and it split up the former government-run generation business. Max Bradford, energy minister of the England-sized nation, was a principal architect of the plan. I interviewed him in Wellington while he was orchestrating what he then described as “wrenching changes.” Recently, I called him in New Zealand to discuss how it has worked out.

  • Nov 21, 2013 | Ken Silverstein

    The nation’s biggest publicly owned utility is quickly evolving. But one such change is still in the mix -- the one to privatize the Tennessee Valley Authority.

  • THE BUSINESS CASE FOR EFFICIENCY
  • Nov 06, 2013 | Ken Silverstein

    When four of the most prominent climate scientists emerged this week and said that nuclear energy was a must-have fuel to combat global warming, the message caught their biggest fans off-guard. Indeed, the green groups are saying that the four know a lot about science but not that much about nuclear power.

  • Support Coincides with National Showing of Pandora's Promise

    Nov 05, 2013 | Ken Silverstein

    More than likely, those high-profile scientists and environmentalists supporting nuclear energy will not persuade their colleagues to change camps -- especially after the Fukushima accident. But they may soften the opposition just enough to allow a few more plants to get built in this country. That’s a start, the scholars say. But will it be enough to avert what they say will be the worst effects of climate change?