Coal

  • CME Group, the world's leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace, announced today the launch of Illinois Basin physically delivered Coal futures contracts in October, pending all regulatory approvals.
  • The Willmar Municipal Utilities and the city of Willmar have settled a discrimination lawsuit filed a year and a half ago in federal district court by former utilities coal handler Nefi Ibarra and will pay him $115,000.
  • North Carolina's environmental agency said Thursday it won't file further coal ash lawsuits against Duke Energy, as advocacy groups prepared to sue the utility next week.
  • Cracks in the ground, some deeper than a man's height, are cropping up on hillsides in the Bull Mountains.
  • Environmentalists warn that a planned regional landfill in Randolph County could become a burial ground for worrisome amounts of coal ash.
  • Whitefish is considering whether it wants to be included in public hearings concerning coal exports from the Powder River Basin of Eastern Montana.
  • The number of coal mines idled in the first half of 2014 slowed compared to second half of 2013, due in part to cold winter weather in early 2014 providing support for a rise in prompt month prices for both Powder River Basin and Central Appalachia coal.
  • Federal regulators have proposed fines totaling $245,000 against two companies accused of violating environmental rules in Eastern Kentucky.
  • Duke Energy today announced it will retire the remaining coal-fired units, 5 and 6, at its W.C. Beckjord Station in New Richmond, Ohio, effective Sept. 1.
  • The University of Dayton announced in June that it would begin divesting coal and fossil fuels from its investment pool, making it the first Catholic university in the U.S. to do so.
  • Residents of the South Fork Valley have seen this coming down the tracks from a mile away.
  • A symbolic City Council resolution condemning the coal-fired power plant -- the last facility of its kind in Connecticut and a top city taxpayer -- as a health hazard is hotter than a smoldering briquette.
  • A coal port just across the Canadian border received a major approval on Thursday, Aug. 21, and expects to open in fall 2015.
  • In 2003, President George W. Bush unveiled plans for the world's first zero-emissions coal plant, a project that would serve as a global showcase of America's ability to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuels.
  • Jul 15, 2014 | Ferdinand E. Banks
    "There is no reason why institutions that have direct holdings in coal, oil and gas stocks could not divest immediately." Ian Simm (Chief executive of Impax Asset Management)
  • Research is Critical

    Jul 06, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    We recently discussed the status of coal generation research with Tomasz S. Wiltowski, the director of the Coal Research Center at Southern Illinois University. His edited comments follow.

  • Peak Coal
    Apr 15, 2014 | Ronald R. Cooke

    Comments about coal are usually not complimentary. Despite our dependence on it as a source of heat for electric power generation, environmentalists wish it would go away. On the other hand, advocates like to claim we have more than 110 years of coal left - "at present rates of consumption". Both sides are overlooking crucial points. Let's see if we can clarify the future use of coal as a fossil fuel resource.

  • Duke Energy's View of Generation and Transmission

    LynnGood
    Apr 13, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    Duke Energy is committed to maintaining a diverse portfolio of generation assets and adequate transmission as it prepares for the futures. Lynn Good, the company’s president and chief executive officer, discussed these nuts and bolts issues recently with EnergyBiz.

  • A Shame to Waste Resource

    Mar 09, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    Given our mountainous supply of coal, it would be a mistake to continue to shutter viable coal-powered generation, according to J. Randall Data, president and chief operating office of Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group.

  • Mar 05, 2014 | Bob Ashworth
    It is important to refute the bad rap that coal is getting. Coal gets a bad name because people say the carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere during the combustion of coal warms the earth. This is completely false.