Regulatory & Legal

  • Michigan's U.S. senators today proposed legislation that would authorize the U.S. Energy Department to spend more than $1 billion over several years on research to improve fuel efficiency in cars and trucks.
  • After months of intense lobbying between the solar industry and NV Energy, lawmakers debated how the state should raise a controversial solar cap and increase the cost of generating electricity with rooftop solar installations.
  • Former Duke Energy chief executive Jim Rogers called out North Carolina legislators Thursday for moving to freeze the state's green-energy standard with a tart "Shame on us."
  • An ambiguous voice vote Wednesday sent to the full Senate a measure that would freeze North Carolina's green-energy standard, which has helped make the state a national leader in solar energy.
  • Citing the "lack of communication and engagement," the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection terminated its agreement with the federal Office of Surface Mine Reclamation on proposed revisions to an environmental impact statement dealing with revisions to federal surface mining regulations.
  • U.S. Rep. Mike Thompson, a senior member of the House Ways and Means Committee, this week introduced the New Energy for America Act which extends investment tax credits for energy efficient residential and commercial property through 2021.
  • The Senate on Wednesday took up a bill to ban power generation companies from signing up residents for electricity contracts with variable rates.
  • A member of a U.S. Senate subcommittee said the Savannah River Site's MOX project is suffering from an "apex of problems" en route to suggesting the nation move forward with an alternative method for plutonium disposition.
  • Rep. Brian Higgins on Wednesday placed a big obstacle in the way of a plan to begin shipping nuclear material over the Peace Bridge next year.
  • A major property tax exemption for new wind developers will end on, 2017, under a bill signed into law Wednesday by Gov. Mary Fallin.
  • The Maine Public Utilities Commission voted Wednesday against reconsidering its controversial decision to cut $38 million in proposed funding from an energy-efficiency program popular with Maine homeowners and businesses.
  • City Council members say that despite the California Public Utilities Commission's decision to deny their request to put the Tehachapi Renewable Transmission Project lines underground in this city, they will continue to oppose the decision and find alternatives.
  • U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development, said approval of appropriations legislation today by the subcommittee shows that there is bipartisan support for "energy research, waterways and national security."
  • Power industry experts are challenging a Public Utilities Commission legal memo issued last week that critiques a Las Vegas tech company for wanting to sever its ties with NV Energy.
  • For the rooftop solar industry, today is one of the few high marks in the legislative session.
  • Merrimack officials say they want more time and information before supporting a 1-megawatt solar-power plant proposed by Pennichuck Water Works, although they left the door open for other solar energy projects.
  • Gov. Jerry Brown sought to reaffirm California's status as a global leader in the fight against climate change Tuesday by signing an agreement with representatives in six foreign nations, including Germany and Brazil, and three U.S. states aiming to keep the world's average temperature from rising another 2 degrees Celsius.
  • Since last June, when Ohio lawmakers froze the state's renewable energy and energy efficiency standards, the state's clean-energy sector has suffered an economic setback and will stay in jeopardy unless the freeze is lifted, an organization of business leaders, investors, and others said Tuesday.
  • A clean energy bill that would require utilities to generate 30 percent of their electricity from renewable energy sources by 2030 is a step closer to making it onto the U.S. Senate floor.
  • Duke Energy Florida and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration have reached an informal settlement agreement in connection with the death of an employee late last year.