Regulatory & Legal

  • The Idaho Public Utilities Commission is approving Idaho Power Company applications to buy energy from three small hydroelectric projects while the procedural schedule for a fourth is temporarily suspended.
  • The Willmar Municipal Utilities and the city of Willmar have settled a discrimination lawsuit filed a year and a half ago in federal district court by former utilities coal handler Nefi Ibarra and will pay him $115,000.
  • North Carolina's environmental agency said Thursday it won't file further coal ash lawsuits against Duke Energy, as advocacy groups prepared to sue the utility next week.
  • Cracks in the ground, some deeper than a man's height, are cropping up on hillsides in the Bull Mountains.
  • State regulators Thursday opened an investigation into the second major security breach at PG&E's Metcalf electricity substation in South San Jose amid rising criticism about how the embattled utility safeguards the region's vital electrical system.
  • A Massachusetts wind power developer has until Sept. 17 to respond to an administrative appeal filed with the Maine Department of Environmental Protection last month by a Carthage woman, a state official ruled Thursday.
  • Construction has been almost nonstop at the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill this year, with workers laboring even during a frigid January to build the treatment plants and filtering systems that keep the worst of the odors at bay.
  • APPA’s Kelly on Emissions, Cybersecurity

    Aug 31, 2014 | Martin Rosenberg

    America’s public power utilities in more than 2,000 communities are wrestling with the new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposals to curb carbon emissions, and at the same time they are joining other energy companies trying to make our grid more secure. Sue Kelly, the new president and chief executive officer of the American Public Power Association, discusses the challenges ahead. 

  • The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has notified officials at the Millstone Power Station about a preliminary finding of a safety violation involving Unit 3's turbine-driving auxiliary feedwater pump.
  • Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) President and CEO Eric Silagy issued the following statement today regarding the Florida Supreme Court's affirmation of the Florida Public Service Commission's approval of FPL's 2012 base rate settlement agreement:
  • Federal regulators have proposed fines totaling $245,000 against two companies accused of violating environmental rules in Eastern Kentucky.
  • Federal environmental regulators failed to include information in rulemaking dockets on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and should withdraw the rules, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and a dozen other attorneys general said.
  • The Public Utilities Commission of Nevada approved on August 26 NV Energy's request to participate in the expanded Energy Imbalance Market (EIM), which automatically optimizes resources across a wide geographic region and in turn reduces energy costs.
  • The Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved a final rule Tuesday that essentially concludes nuclear waste can be stored on-site for 160 years or more after a reactor has shut down.
  • Xcel Energy asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Tuesday to issue a ruling that Boulder cannot condemn a high voltage transmission line that circles the city without first getting the federal regulators' permission.
  • The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will hold a public meeting from 5 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3, at the Susquehanna Energy Information Center, 634 Salem Boulevard (U.S. Route 11).
  • While a new federal proposal won't affect West Virginia as much as other states, the policy stands on "shaky ground," according to the former top attorney for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • The Nuclear Regulatory Commission today approved a plan to store nuclear wastes on site at nuclear plants, ending a two-year suspension on final licensing decisions and clearing the way for the Tennessee Valley Authority to proceed with adding another reactor at its Watts Bar Nuclear Plant.
  • The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission today affirmed a final rule addressing the continued storage of used nuclear fuel between the end of reactors' licensed terms and its ultimate removal for disposal.
  • A symbolic City Council resolution condemning the coal-fired power plant -- the last facility of its kind in Connecticut and a top city taxpayer -- as a health hazard is hotter than a smoldering briquette.