Commentary

  • Author photo
    Jun 10, 2014 | Charles Botsford
    Residential charging in single family homes is the most prevalent, convenient, and generally lowest cost charging method for Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs). It is PEV charging at its most basic form and at its highest level of importance. All other forms of PEV charging, such as charging at workplaces, multi-dwelling units, and public venues should be judged against residential charging relative to need, cost and convenience for widespread PEV adoption to take hold.
  • Jun 05, 2014 | Randy Burns
    Last fall I wrote an article regarding liquefied natural gas (LNG) and its impact on the U.S. energy picture. Although no new significant developments have transpired since the article was written, LNG continues to dominate news headlines because its potential to impact natural gas prices is profound.
  • Author photo
    Jun 04, 2014 | Wayne M. Kovach
    Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a highly controversial subject. Those in favor of it would argue that its gains, namely cleaner and cheaper energy (as opposed to coal), certainly outweigh the risks. Those opposed would argue that more investments in fossil fuel sources only hurt our environment more and push back advancements in renewable energy technology. While that debate will likely continue, the hope for some middle ground lies with "green fracking."
  • Author photo
    Jun 03, 2014 | Howard Ng
    In a recent article, I discussed the strengths and weaknesses of a ZigBee-based advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) system for demand response (DR). In the second installment of this series, I will be exploring an alternative communication option for DR that offers more benefits and fewer disadvantages: a ZigBee broadband gateway.
  • Author photo
    May 30, 2014 | Bryan Leyland
    The technologies described in this series generate electricity when their resource is available not when it is needed. In any power system, the generation must match the demand on a second by second basis. So, to go large-scale, renewable energy needs to find a technology that will store energy efficiently and at a low cost.
  • Author photo
    May 28, 2014 | Darshan Goswami
    By 2050, India could go 100% on Renewable Energy to create a sustainable energy future. In the coming years, India will face seemingly insurmountable challenges to its economy, environment and energy security. To overcome these challenges India needs to shift to non-polluting sources of energy.
  • Author photo
    May 27, 2014 | Wayne M. Kovach
    Always thought to be the more controversial side of demand response (DR) and energy management plans, the idea of utilities and energy companies employing residential demand response programs in the near future is gaining traction. Though there is a small segment of the energy industry that sees this as a futile attempt, more and more people understand the benefits of this tougher, but beneficial energy efficient resource.
  • Author photo
    May 23, 2014 | Bryan Leyland
    The potential energy in waves is enormous, so it is not surprising that there have been many attempts to use them to generate electricity. But while the potential is there, harnessing it is neither easy nor cheap. It is extremely difficult to design something that will survive a storm and, at the same time, generate electricity efficiently and economically during average wave conditions.
  • Author photo
    May 22, 2014 | Shlomi Palas
    When a company produces 150 tons of food waste every day that is either a huge problem or a great opportunity to innovate and produce energy. Grocery stores, restaurants, sports arenas, schools, and hospitals in the U.S. generate an average of two tons - 4,000 pounds - of food waste per week. An estimated 35 million tons of food waste from commercial and residential sources end up in U.S. landfills each year, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Author photo
    May 21, 2014 | Brad Yaggie, BOC
    According to the National Lighting Bureau, poor lighting conditions cause the productivity levels of your employees to fall by 5% and can even lead to physical stressors like eyestrain, blurred vision, and headaches. Increasing light levels while decreasing your energy consumption will not only take care of your employees by making them more productive but it will also maximize your profitability by cutting your energy bill by as much as 40%.